HTML5 News

Mozilla App Store

Posted 12:51PM on February 24 2012 by Pascal Rettig

Mozilla is launching their HTML5 App Store project. at apps.mozillalabs.com with a summary description of:

The Mozilla Labs Apps project is an initiative by Mozilla, the non-profit Firefox developer and champion of the Web, to bring HTML5 app experiences built using Web standards and open technologies to all your devices, wherever you are.

Here's hoping to a viable competitor to the Google Chrome store, with more competition and choice, everyone wins.

Check out the Demo Apps


Game Closure Raise $12 Million

Posted 08:29AM on February 24 2012 by Pascal Rettig

Showing that there's serious money in HTML5 games (at least if you're getting it from VCs) Html5 game company Game Closure has raised a $12 million round from a group of VCs including General Catalyst and Highland Capital.


Read the full story on venture beat

TechCrunch also has a report on the raise.


MocoSpace launching five new HTML5 games

Posted 17:37PM on February 22 2012 by Pascal Rettig

GameZebo has a post on mobile social networking platform MocoSpace's launch of 5 new HTML5 games:

MocoSpace got into the HTML5 Game world a good deal earlier than most with the launch of its HTML5 Game Platform last year and all games were built by third-parties using a portion of the company's $2 Million HTML Game Developer fund, bringing the total number of HTML5 games on the platform to 30.

Read  more on GameZebo.com


ImpactJS Resources and Giveaway

Posted 17:27PM on February 22 2012 by Pascal Rettig

Andrzej at dev.end3r.com has put together a nice post on talking about the Impact.js engine (which has a book now) and is holding a giveaway of 5 Impact licenses for Tweeting about the giveaway.


O'Reilly publishes first game-engine specific HTML5 Book (on Impact.js)

Posted 09:06AM on February 22 2012 by Pascal Rettig

O'Reilly media has published one of it's world-renowned Animal Cover books on HTML5 Game Development titled: 

Introducing HTML5 Game Development
Developing Games with Impact 

It's a short book (120 pages) but it marks a milestone in that it's the first (to my knowledge) paper book published which is entirely targeted a single Engine in the nascent HTML5 Tools Space.

Impact.js was one of the first HTML5 Engines released and has been getting better all the time.

You can grab the book in both Paper Form 

Paper Form or in Kindle Form for under $10 on Amazon, or straight from Oreilly for a few bucks more.


How Construct 2 helps make HTML5 work

Posted 08:54AM on February 22 2012 by Pascal Rettig

A nice blog post on the Scirra Blog (Scirra are the makers of the Construct 2 HTML5 Game IDE) that could rightfully be called "Shooting down some of the myths of HTML5 Game Development" such as:

"Javascript is ugly!"
"Javascript is slow!"
"You can't run HTML5 games from the desktop!"
"It all has to be open source (there's no way to hide code)"

Some of the points are specifically for Construct2, but it's a good read for people concerned about some of the drawback of HTML5 Game Development 

 

Read the full article


PayOne HTML5 API by PaymentOne

Posted 12:03PM on February 21 2012 by Pascal Rettig Categories: Payment

Mobile payment company PaymentOne has launched a new HTML5 Payment API with the goal of allow developers to create write-once cross platform games with HTML5 and but take advantage of direct to carrier billing that shows up on users monthly statements.

Here's how PaymentOne describes the process on their website:

The One Click and HTML5 payment options integrate easily right into the application with a few simple steps. Once integrated, charging for the premium features or selling virtual goods in-app is easy. With One Click for Android, the consumer simply accepts the charges and has it added to their monthly carrier bill. With HTML5, consumers enter the mobile number, confirm the PIN code and complete the transaction. Download our API documents.


HTML5 Gaming - what are we talking about?

Posted 12:32PM on February 20 2012 by Pascal Rettig

Mark from Spacemonster.co.uk has written a post titled "HTML5 Gaming - what are we talking about?" discussing the ever changing conversation from "Hey this looks like cool tech" to the current state of "Hey, how do you make money from HTML5 Games?"

As bigger players like Facebook and Zynga start to put a big fat bullseye around HTML5 games, it's an interesting conversation to have regarding the tooling available on the platform and where developers should be spending their time and effort.

Read the post.


HTML5 Rocks new site relaunch

Posted 12:51PM on February 17 2012 by Pascal Rettig

HTML5 Rocks, a Google sponsored project aimed at pushing the web forward has relaunched with a nice new theme and some new organization and content. Check out the Gaming landing page along with all the Gaming related tutorials


Response to: Why developing an HTML5 game is too damn risky

Posted 09:26AM on February 17 2012 by Pascal Rettig

A blog post on ektomarch.com makes the case as to why developing a HTML5 game is too damn risky, based on the appearance and presence of browser bugs (he specifically mentions Chrome as a culprit). It's a good read to understand the Dark Site of HTML5

We've had problems ourselves on GamesForLanguage.com (specifically with sound) and I understand the frustration around having things suddenly not work that worked before, but there's a flip side as well.

When you develop on HTML5 you:

1. Aren't dependent on a single vendor (Adobe) that may or may not care about bugs and issues affecting you.
2. Automatically can target nearly every platform known to man (Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS, Android) 
3. Are working in an ecosystem where the time to changes, fixes and new features are measured in weeks not months and years. 
4. Can update any piece of your product instantly, without waiting on a gatekeeper.
5. Can be pretty sure your game is going to run 6 months from and 6 years from know, no matter what various proprietary vendors do or don't do to change direction (Remember when Flash on Mobile was the next big thing? Then Silverlight?)

So is it perfect as a platform? Nope. But it's a pretty damn useful and a hell of a lot of fun to be involved in right now.

< <    1 .. 6 7 8 9 10 .. 13   > >